The Neurax® system is based around a specialised small-bore connector system, moulded from hard plastic, which is either permanently-fitted or moulded onto specific small-diameter tubular medical devices, typically needles, syringes, microbial filters, drug containers and flexible fluid-conducting tubes.

Neurax Products

Neurax® connectors enhance the safety aspects of these products, which are designed to be used to sample spinal fluid or deliver drugs, including local anaesthetics and cancer chemotherapy, into the spaces surrounding the nerves in the central nervous system.

The safety enhancement is achieved by making the connectors dimensionally and mechanically incompatible with the standard ISO 'luer' connector. Luer connectors are fitted to medical devices, such as hypodermic needles, IV cannulae and syringes, which are intended either to be inserted into blood vessels or gain access to the blood, directly or indirectly.

Drugs contained in equipment fitted with Neurax® connectors cannot be injected into a blood vessel via a ‘luer’ connector. Likewise, drugs intended to be given into the bloodstream via a normal ‘luer’ syringe cannot be injected into the spinal fluid or epidural space if a Neurax®-fitted device is used. The Neurax® connector also cannot be connected to luer-compatible needle-free access ports commonly fitted to intravenous lines.

Whilst the Neurax® system components are fully-compatible with each other, attempts to make a connection between a Neurax® connector and either a 'luer', or any larger medical connector, will result in an incomplete seal, thwarting attempts at establishing a fluid-tight pathway.
Neurax is available via the NHS Supply Chain or direct from B-Link (UK) Ltd

Latest News

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Independent Clinical Tests give ‘thumbs-up’ to Neurax - July 2010

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Neurax successfully passes all tests set by the National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) – June 2010

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Leeds-based B-Link (UK) Ltd have today announced a revolutionary new safety invention designed to prevent medical errors in the form of ‘wrong route’ drug administration.
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